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The Heritage of Cain Isabel Ostrander

The Heritage of Cain

Isabel Ostrander

Published February 8th 2012
ISBN : 9781458881403
Paperback
170 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated.1916 Excerpt: ... CHAPTER XV Paste Jewels SATURDAYMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated.1916 Excerpt: ... CHAPTER XV Paste Jewels SATURDAY mornings published news was significant. All the papers voiced an ominous note of dissatisfaction at the apparent inactivity of the police--an echo of the general public unrest. The Van Rensselaer case, since its first meager details had reached the press, had been given precedence over events of national import, not only because of the social prominence of the unfortunate family involved, but because of the sensational nature of the crime itself and the dramatic episodes connected with it. It bade fair to be the most marked event in the criminal annals of the decade- and never had the police been so impotent, never had they exhibited such glaring incompetence. Yorke realized that such a scathing denunciation would have a salient effect, and the police department, not content only with pursuing their unavailing search for the missing maid, would cast about wildly for another clue, and would proceed to gather into their net the first individual they could, with any semblance of motive, connective temporarily with their investigation as a stop-gap to public criticism and censure. And in one of the more conservative dailies he came upon the indication he had anticipated for two days. A reporter more shrewd than the others had followed the same course which had obviously suggested itself to Yorke when the paucity of direct clues forced him to seek a problematic incentive, and his column contained a daring allusion to the principal legatee of the murdered woman which Yorke knew the police would not be slow to follow up. If Paul Hildreth persisted in his course of obstinate silence with the authorities, as he had with Yorke, his position would speedily become precarious, and, unless a significant clue was discovered in the interi...