Home » Pushing Time Away: My Grandfather and the Tragedy of Jewish Vienna by Peter Singer
Pushing Time Away: My Grandfather and the Tragedy of Jewish Vienna Peter Singer

Pushing Time Away: My Grandfather and the Tragedy of Jewish Vienna

Peter Singer

Published
ISBN : 9781862077799
Paperback
254 pages
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 About the Book 

What binds us pushes time away wrote David Oppenheim to his future wife, Amalie Pollak, on March 24, 1905. Oppenheim, classical scholar, collaborator, then critic of Sigmund Freud, and friend and supporter of Alfred Adler, lived through the heightsMoreWhat binds us pushes time away wrote David Oppenheim to his future wife, Amalie Pollak, on March 24, 1905. Oppenheim, classical scholar, collaborator, then critic of Sigmund Freud, and friend and supporter of Alfred Adler, lived through the heights and depths of Viennas twentieth-century intellectual and cultural history. He perished in obscurity at a Nazi concentration camp in 1943, separated from family and friends, leaving his grandson, the philosopher Peter Singer, without a chance to know him.Almost fifty years later Peter Singer set out to explore the life of the grandfather he never knew, and found a scholar whose ideas on ethics and human nature often parallel his own writings. Drawing on a wealth of documents and personal letters, Singer made startling discoveries about his grandparents early romantic attachments, the basis on which they decide to marry, their professional aspirations, and their differing views of Judaism. An essay that Oppenheim co-wrote with Freud, but which was suppressed because of a bitter split within Freuds psychoanalytical society, leads Singer to explore the difficulties of following ones own ideas in the circles of both Freud and Adler.Combining touching family biography with thoughtful reflection on both personal and public questions we face today, Pushing Time Away captures critical moments in Europes transition from Belle Époque to the Great War and to the rise of Fascism and the coming of World War II. Singer gives us a vivid portrait of Vienna when it was the center of European culture and new ideas, a culture that was both intensely Jewish and distinctly secular. Examining this culture and its fate forcesSinger to confront one of the foundations of his own thought: How much can we rely on universal values and human reason?